Sustainable Development

 

Our History & Our Future Set Us Apart

Our founders were pioneers exploring the resources of the American West. In 1881, they discovered borates in Death Valley, one of the driest and hottest places on Earth.

From 1883 to 1889, our famous 20 Mule Teams pulled massive wagons hauling borax from Death Valley to the railhead near Mojave, a grueling 165 mile, ten-day trip through high temperatures, deep sands and steep grades.

Working in these unforgiving conditions required careful consideration of water, resources and people. In six years, the team hauled more than 15 million pounds of borax. No team member or mule was ever lost.
Our pioneer founders also developed a deep respect for Death Valley’s unique beauty and geological makeup, inspiring company leaders to work with Congress to establish the National Park Service, which celebrates its Centennial in 2016. Donated land from U.S. Borax officially became Death Valley National Park in 1994.

Today, 145 years later, Rio Tinto Minerals remains committed to the environmental preservation and
safety practices that are the foundation of our operating principles. Since 2001, our Sustainable Development program has guided how we measure, improve and report on social, environmental and economic performance.
At our current industrial-scale operations in Boron, we continually look for ways to reduce water, energy and greenhouse gas emissions, while protecting the health and well-being of our employees. California’s extreme drought conditions have accelerated our efforts to reduce our carbon footprint while delivering an important rare mineral that’s essential for modern living.

Our ongoing efforts strongly contribute to our vision “To be the sector leading global industrial minerals supplier that creates better quality of life and sustainable value through our product offerings.”

To find out more, visit Rio Tinto at:

 

Latest From Our Experts

Kern County nonprofit organizations awarded $25,000 in grants

RioTinto ● May 17, 2017

May 17, 2017 – For immediate release BORON, CA – Ten East Kern County nonprofit organizations were awarded $25,000 in grants…

More...

Rio Tinto Borates opens new Wildlife Rescue Center

RioTinto ● September 9, 2016

Waterfowl in California have found a friend in Rio Tinto. Environmental employees at the Boron Operations are taking care of their…

More...

From grain to glass – New degree in Craft Beer Industry on tap for fall at MSU Denver

RioTinto ● August 25, 2016

A new degree program is on tap at Metropolitan State University of Denver. This fall, students will have the opportunity…

More...

CASE STUDY: Setting new standards for reclamation in the Mojave Desert

RioTinto ● July 1, 2016

Boron Operations is a world-class borate mine located in the western Mojave Desert of California. The climate is classified as harsh,…

More...

CASE STUDY: Minding the Gap

RioTinto ● June 1, 2016

Rio Tinto’s Minerals business worked closely with the City of Los Angeles to support the region’s water quality and conservation. Groundwater…

More...

Boron nonprofits awarded $20,000 in grants

RioTinto ● May 23, 2016

The Borax Visitor Center Foundation awarded about $20,000 in grants to more than a dozen nonprofits at its annual luncheon at…

More...

Wilmington Operations

RioTinto ● Jul 29, 2016

Recycled Materials Support Community Causes at Wilmington Operations The Wilmington facility at the Port of Los Angeles has been in continuous operation…

More...

International Women’s Day

RioTinto ● March 8, 2016

Educational Outreach As part of Rio Sava’s community engagement programme, Rio Sava staff members have visited local elementary schools to talk…

More...